Bring the cookies back!

Many+students++at+HB+aren%27t+pleased+with+the+change+that+has+been+made+to+their+lunch+options.

Katryn Thibeault, Dylan Conlon

Many students at HB aren’t pleased with the change that has been made to their lunch options.

Katryn Thibeault and Dylan Conlon

“Bring the Cookies Back!” Max Macleod, ‘17 pleaded.

What happened to those signature cookies only the HBHS lunchroom had to offer? Michelle Obama signed the new Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which resulted in us losing our beloved cookies.  These new rules require school lunches to meet healthier standards such as making at least 50 percent of all grains in our lunches to whole grains. While this campaign adds a variety of new healthy options, it takes away a lot of the foods that students love.

The Herald Tribune says “Lunch trays are required to have at least a half-cup of fruits or vegetables, and milk must contain no more than one percent fat. The rules also ban trans fats and set higher minimum calorie levels for each students meal.”

Some kids don’t even notice the changes.

“There are upgrades?” questioned Evan Sutton, ’17.

Others, like Becca Maxwell, ‘15 thought the school should go further with the upgrades and “add more variety”.

Although some don’t  mind, the general consensus of HB is that, in the words of Nadine Monachelli, ‘15: “Its all gone down hill.”

Wesley Mansfield, ’15 said “This healthy crap needs to go, I’m already skinny.”

According to the Washington Times, “GAO investigators said 321 school districts dropped out of the school lunch program altogether in the previous year, and many did so to avoid the mandates.”

Our school took away Trail Mix, Welchs gummies, our favorite cookies, and even caesar dressing because it contained too many grams of trans fat. They took away a salad dressing option that we should be able to decide to eat or not, yet they are allowed to have mayonnaise that is months expired. How does that make sense?

The only way that the lunch menu will ever have the chance to change, is if we do something about it. We, as students, need to take a stand. We cannot just sit around and hope for other people to do that job for us.